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Tag Archives: widget

How to Improve your Android Experience (Without Rooting)

If you have a new Android phone or tablet, or even if you have an older Android device that you’re looking to get more out of, then you can upgrade your experience in only a few minutes using a collection of free and paid apps. Fortunately, you won’t have to root your phone or risk damaging its software in anyway along the way.

Most of the apps and services described below require at least Android 4.0. Some of them have free versions, but I’ve linked to the paid version when possible, since I want to support these developers and to promote ad-free software.

1. Install a custom launcher

Nova Launcher

Nova Launcher in action.

What’s a custom launcher? In plain English, it’s the service that is triggered whenever you hit the home button on your phone or open up your all apps drawer. Facebook Home is the most famous custom launcher for Android, but it isn’t good, because it does the opposite of what a good launcher should do: enhance the value of your entire suite of apps and services.

Nova Launcher (Prime) is one of my favorite custom launchers. Here’s what it lets you do:

  • Change how your app icons look: see the entry below on icon packs.
  • Hide icons for unused system apps (without disabling them): you won’t have to skim over “Navigation” or “News and Weather” anymore.
  • Control your home screens with custom gestures: for example, double tap to bring up Nova Settings, pinch-out to show multitasking bar, or pinch-in to see all homescreens, for example.
  • Add unread counts to certain app icons: Android doesn’t support these numbered badges by default.
  • Scroll more quickly thru screens: Nova and other launchers allow for rapid, silky smooth animations and screen transitions.
Settings Android

Nova Settings menu, from which you can hide specific apps or customize your gestures, folders, desktop, and dock.

2. Buy an icon pack or use LINE Deco

Icon Pack Android

The Lustre icon pack for Android, running on Nova Launcher Prime.

Icon packs can beautify your Android experience by giving all of your app icons a unified aesthetic (e.g., make them all blue, or make them all square and flat). They only work if you are running a custom launcher. In many cases, the icon pack will radically change how an app’s icon look and how you think about it: Snapchat may become like a Pac-Man ghost, for example:

Icon Pack Android

SMPL Blue icon pack running on Nova Launcher Prime. Note the Snapchat icon the second from left in the dock.

My favorites include: SMPL Blue, Stark, Vintage, and Lustre. LINE Deco is also a great option since it’s free and has a ton of constantly updated with community contributions:

Screenshot (03:14PM, Apr 13, 2014)

A home screen made with LINE Deco

3. Replace the stock Android keyboard

Swype Keyboard for Android

Swype + Dragon in action.

Android’s keyboard took a quantum leap forward with gesture typing in Jelly Bean, but it’s no match for some of the 3rd-party alternatives available (and said alternatives are essential if you’re running a version of Android that doesn’t support gesture typing out of the box).

My favorite is Swype, which is much more accurate, features a good dictation system (called Dragon), lots of custom gestures, and uses an account system to backup your custom dictionaries. It will literally save you minutes each day by cutting down on stupid autocorrect mistakes or miscues from the stock keyboard.

SwiftKey is another popular alternative. Also, if you don’t have Google Keyboard, it’s free to download.

4. Install Dashclock Widget

Dashclock Widget Android

A sample Dashclock Widget running on Android 4.2.2. Extensions for Eye in Sky Weather, Battery Widget Reborn, inQuotes, and Logika Word of the Day have been added.

Dashclock Widget is a must-have for Android 4.2+. It gives you a rich set of information (unread Gmail/SMS, missed calls, weather) right on your lockscreen, plus it’s highly customizable via slew of 3rd-party extensions.

5. Install DuckDuckGo Search and Stories

Screenshot_2014-08-31-15-27-07

The DuckDuckGo search bar and story feed.

DuckDuckGo is an alternative search engine, but it’s not a second-rate Google clone. It gives the same results to every person (no filter bubble), plus it’s the best generic news reader I’ve ever used on Android. It draws upon various subreddits and leading publications (NYT, WSJ, Re/code, Vox) to provide a fast, unique overview of the day’s news. Plus, it’s compatible with Orbot for secure prowling via a Tor proxy.

6. Install Battery Widget Reborn

Battery Widget Reborn Android

Data from Battery Widget Reborn.

Battery Widget Reborn is an efficient way to keep tabs on your battery level, usage, and history. It has a persistent, expandable notification that can give you estimated battery life remaining (or time until the phone is fully charged) and that can also put the phone into “night mode,” disabling all mobile data, background sync, wifi, and bluetooth for as long as you wish. You can also set up automatic “night mode” periods, such as from 12-8am.

7. Tweak your input settings for better battery life

Battery saving Android

Two of the settings (circled) that can disabled for better battery life.

You can save a ton of battery life on Android by simply tweaking some settings like haptic feedback, lock/unlock sounds, and 2g/3g network usage. I’ve written a more comprehensive entry about battery life here.

8. Install MX Player Pro

MX Player Pro video player Android

MX Player Pro’s default screen.

Android isn’t good at video playback. Luckily, MX Player Pro solves that problem by giving you a clean, hardware-accelerated player with lots of simple gestures.

9. Use top-shelf alternatives to official/stock social network apps

Flipster Pro for Facebook

Flipster Pro for Facebook showing a sample NewsFeed.

The official Facebook app is a battery-drainer and remarkably unstable, too. Twitter has been getting better, but I still prefer a 3rd-party client. Many of these clients, whether they are for Twitter or another network, often have better design and are more battery-efficient (in the case of Facebook and Twitter clients, they refresh less often). Here are some good clients to use:

10. Maximize your widgets

BW Pro / Beautiful Widgets

Beautiful Widgets Pro screensaver/Daydream, with windshield wiper animation to indicate rain.

Many apps have widgets that can display useful information and act as your launcher icon for that app (so that you don’t have to stick its icon in your dock or on your homescreen. There are a lot of good widgets, as well as some good standalone widgets apps like the peerless Beautiful Widgets Pro, which I used to display the current date and weather.

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6 Best Android Clock Widgets

Clock Widgets

Some sample clock widgets.

There’s nothing more iconic in the Android operating system than the clock widget. From HTC’s distinctive digital clock to the stock ICS/Jelly Bean analog clock, a good clock widget is essential to quintessential Android.

I’ve rounded up some of my favorite clock widgets, and provided links below as well.

Holo Clock++

Holo Clock++

Holo Clock++

My favorite. It’s stylish, coming in both white and “Android blue” (a label I almost wish Samsun would use in place of “Pebble Blue“). It displays battery percentage and has a novel approach to hour/minute. Everything is resizable, plus it’s free: plus plus, indeed.

Holo Clock Widget

Holo Clock Widget

Holo Clock Widget.

A nice, big clock that comes in a variety of colors and which links directly to the Clock app. I prefer blue/black, but the red one also goes well with the fantastic SMPL Red icon pack from Creativity.

Clock Now

Clock Now

Clock Now widget.

A very functionalist clock widget: rectangular, with time and a variety of widgets. It works much like a clock-ified version of Battery Widget Reborn, showing you toggles for Bluetooth, wifi, cell data, etc.

Android Clock Widget Pack

Android Clock Widget

Android Clock Widget Pack

Because who doesn’t want a clock that looks like the Android mascot? It doesn’t provide any functionality (not even clicking thru to the stock Clock, sadly) but I enjoy pairing the blue one with the SMPL Blue icon theme.

Beautiful Widgets Pro

Beautiful Widgets Pro

Beautiful Widgets Pro clock widget.

Beautiful Widgets Pro is a nice paid widget pack that lets you add widgets of all sizes to your homescreens. It has clock and clock+weather widgets, and it even has its own theme store that has themes and skins for customizing your widgets.

UCCW

Ultimate Custom Clock Widget

A sample UCCW skin.

UCCW is the Ultimate Custom Clock Widget, but it also allows for widgets of all kinds. You’ll need to install UCCW and then pick from one of its many compatible 1st and 3rd-party skins to get the exact look you want (or create your own). Just search for UCCW in Google Play and it will return 1000s of compatible skins.

How to use Dashclock Widget

Note: on Android KitKat (4.4.x), be sure to go to Settings -> Security -> Enable Widgets to make DashClock usable!

Dashclock Widget is almost a staple on Android 4.2.x devices. It’s a free, fun, and highly customizable lockscreen widget. Here’s how to use it.

Dashclock Widget

Dashclock Widget.

1. Download the free Dashclock Widget app from Google Play.

Dashclock Widget

Adding a new lockscreen widget.

New Widget

Dashclock Widget in the add new lockscreen widget menu.

2. Add Dashclock Widget as a lockscreen widget. You can do this by swiping all the way to the left on your lockscreen and tapping the large “+” sign. Select “Dashclock Widget” and then position it as you like. You can use it to replace your default digital clock widget if you so choose.

Dashclock Widget menu

Dashclock Widget settings/setup.

3. Begin customizing.  Dashclock comes with extensions for Gmail, Calendar, and other apps out of the box, so you can enable/disable individual ones, and reorder/reposition them, too.

Dashclock Extensions

Some sample Dashclock Extensions.

4. Shop for more extensions and compatible apps. I’ve written a quick guide to extensions here. There are a lot of 3rd-party apps that support Dashclock Widget, including Falcon Pro, Eye in Sky, Press, and PushBullet. There are also some handy standalone extensions (non-apps, so to say) like Dashclock Word of the Day and inQuotes Extension. And, above all, consider AnyDash Pro, which lets you add notifications from any app to Dashclock Widget – I’ve found this handy for Snapchat and the stock Email client in particular.

-The ScreenGrab Team