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Tag Archives: lumia 920

Nexus 4 Wireless Charging Orb Review

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The Nexus 4 supports wireless charging via the Qi standard. But until this week, LG’s official charging orb – a sci-fi worthy trinket that looks like a Palm Touchstone or the better half of the ill-fated Nexus Q – had remained vaporware. No more: for a cool $60 USD, you can win the envy of every techie around you and free your phone from microUSB charging.

The orb’s sleek, futuristic design is a proclamation of Google’s (via LG) growing attention to form as much as function. It’s light, smooth, and yet premium-feeling, not unlike an iPhone 5. But make no mistake, this orb is mainly about style. It must be plugged into a power source via the microUSB cable and travel adapter (US/Canada only) while it charges your Nexus 4 or other Qi-compatible phone (just for reference, I was able to charge a Nokia Lumia 920 using this orb, too).

For either phone, charging via Qi is not necessarily an upgrade over standard cabled charging: it takes longer (about four hours for the Nexus 4, if it’s totally drained) and requires more hardware, too. Mostly, it just looks cool. But it does have one major perk which I can see improving one’s experience with their phone: its doubling as a dock.

The phone can be charged successfully at either horizontal or vertical orientations, but I preferred vertical, which puts the phone at a nice viewing angle for reading, checking email, or other one-handed/-fingered tasks. In this way, the orb became a surprisingly well-integrated part of my workstation, and even when I wasn’t interacting with it, it served as a passive news source, since I had set up Google Currents as the default Daydream (a feature of Android 4.2.x which is akin to a screensaver displayed while your Nexus device charges). The 4.2.2 update also brings a special notification sound reserved only for indicating that wireless charging has begun.

This orb is mostly style, but some substance, too. Its usefulness as a dock underscores the benefits of having a larger-screened phone with plenty of real estate for reading or typing. In that sense, it’s reaffirms everything that’s good about the Nexus 4. Highly recommended to completists, geeks, and productivity nuts, but perhaps just a novelty or unnecessary toy for the casual Android fan.

-The ScreenGrab Team

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Windows Phone and “Communication”

I went to an AT&T store today to get my Nexus 4 fully activated. The experience ended up being much more positive than my admittedly low expectations had prepped me for. Along the way, the tech savvy clerk and I discussed his experiences with some of the devices in the store, specifically the HTC One X and the Nokia Lumia 920.

I won’t bore you with reviews of these phones, both of which are fantastic pieces of hardware that are flagship devices for their respective platforms. But in justifying his abandonment of the 920 in favor of the One X, he said that Windows Phone was good for “communicating” but not “much else,” with much of said “much else” being apps.

It reminded me of a recent TechCrunch piece about Nokia’s decline, in which the author argued that the Finnish giant lost its way when it became obsessed with improving the phone functionality of its services and not foreseeing that data would become more important than voice. Ironic then, that is partnership with Microsoft would end up bringing it back to the same behavior that necessitated such a partnership in the first place.

Microsoft and Nokia either fail to see that there is more value in data than voice/traditional comms or they simply can’t compete when it comes to data. I expect that the latter is true, primarily due to their tardiness in entering mobile with Windows Phone 7/8 (three years after the first iPhone, two years after the Android G1), but at the same time I think that they’ve failed to compete in part because they failed to see the value of data.

Windows Phone is in a way the software equivalent of Nokia’s current hardware: beautiful, totally different from anything in the mainstream, and barely used. As a “phone” – something that can make high-quality calls, sort thru contacts, and perform basic tasks, it’s fine, but when you try to do something as simple as peruse Twitter, it stumbles early and often.

If it’s not enough to simply “communicate” anymore, however, then the carriers themselves ought to be just a bit wary of the smartphone market’s vitality. While hoary institutions like SMS and cellular data are not shuffling of this mortal coil any time soon, the notion that the “phone” is the default communication device could be in trouble.

iMessage and Snapchat, whose combined scale is still small, are nevertheless two excellent examples of lightweight apps that would be right at home on a wearable device like Google Glass or the increasingly mythical iWatch “smartwatch.” And while such services would allow for “communication,” they would be data hogs first and foremost, with features like cellular calls and SMS likely taking a back seat to the various in-app walled gardens, or to some aggregation service like Google Now.

One could argue that we are already there with smartphones. I know people who have moved the iPhone Phone app to the dreaded junk folder along with defaults like Videos and Reminders. But the elite status of the iPhone is still seen in the huge prestige gap between it and the iPod, the latter of which has no competitors and is more about fun than a full mobile experience.

Oddly, the lackluster status of Windows Phone as a glorified feature phone could open the doors for Microsoft and Nokia to simply leapfrog the smartphone paradigm and release a must have wearable computer. This is what Apple did with the iPod: lagging badly in the CD burning race (the first iMacs shipped without one), it decided to just change the game rather than play catchup. The same can be said of what it did to netbooks with the iPad.

In any case this seems to confirm my ongoing pessimism about Windows Phone, its opportunities in China notwithstanding. “Communicating” isn’t enough, which of course is obvious in the smartphone era – but though the phone is still king for now, this decline in the value of traditional “communication” means that it is already losing ground to the very things (data, apps, services) that is so perfectly enables (via cellular networks).

Paradoxically, by not seeing that, Microsoft et all may be best positioned to exploit the shift – they could just throw in the towel when it comes to smartphones, and try their luck at something else. But I expect at some level that they do not so much “not see” that a smartphone’s value has more to do with data than call quality and specs, but that they instead have just not competed, in large part because they just don’t get what users want.

– The ScreenGrabTeam